REALITY DOSE FOR THE DAY ~ Lisa Renee on ‘Astral Bliss’

“New Age astral bliss narratives are filled with fantastical illusions, wishful and magical thinking, self-deception and escapist fantasies of the rainbows and butterflies outlook on life that appear to be like a Disney movie. Many times, severely emotionally wounded people are led into the New Age, where they are not interested in healing themselves or taking responsibility for their behaviors. They seek instead, further excuses to continue negative behaviors and being deceptive to others, in an accepted social setting. These naïve astral visions propagated by the New Age hijack have filled people’s minds with denial, one of the most potent forms of fear-based programming. Denying the nature of reality and denying the painful truth by remaining in escapism and complacency by avoiding self-responsibility. There is a delusional psychosis that is spread and promoted to shape and reinforce very negative behavior as acceptable behavior in some of the New Age circles, in order to groom these people as hosts and sleepers for serving the Thothian Luciferians. The New Age hijack is what has been created in groups who refuse to grow up, or to become accountable for their behaviors and responsible for their lives, thus, committing to a personal value system that evolves into spiritual maturity and self-integrity.”

~Lisa Renee

 

~via New Age, Ascension And Disclosure Hijack

REBECCA TURNER: “9 Reasons Why Everyone Should Lucid Dream”

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Here is my list of the 9 reasons why everyone should lucid dream. These include profound benefits that touch all of us, no matter our culture, beliefs or life circumstances. Ultimately, I think all of these benefits put together would play a serious role in advancing the human race, if only it was something that came naturally to all of us. What I’m really saying is: lucidity is a powerful mental tool like no other.

1. Lucid dreaming creates freedom and escapism.

This is probably the one and only reason most people initially pursue consciousness in dreams — to have sex with their secret crush, to re-enact a day in the life of Jack Bauer, or to fly like an eagle over breathtaking scenery. We all have unfulfilled desires and lucidity is an amazing way to experience them in stunning realism. It is our natural virtual reality headset, our one portal to other worlds where we can temporarily escape this reality and live the life of our dreams… Literally.

If you’re not a lucid dreamer, think of this escapism as akin to watching a movie or diving into a novel. But here, you are the central protagonist and all the characters, plot twists and epiphanies are profoundly tailored to your needs. An experienced oneironaut can manifest anything they want in a guided dream, or they can let the dream movie play out of its own volition. This gives us both the ultimate power to create any situation imaginable, and the thrill of being presented with unexpected twists and turns produced by our own subconscious.

Many people never get over the need for escapism in lucid dreams. The important thing is to remember — at least every now and then — to reach beyond the novelty value and see the potential of conscious dreaming as it truly stands.

2. Lucid dreaming reveals the power of your brain.

When you become conscious in the dream state, you have an astonishing opportunity to experience a vivid and tangible dreamworld that is not actually real. Probably the most shocking example of this is a false awakening, where the dreamer becomes convinced they are awake — so vivid is the detail of the dream. Think about that: in a sleep state, where your body is processing only the tiniest amounts of external stimulus, your internal world is as rich as it ever was. Your brain realistically reproduces a world with tables, buildings, gravity, air, emotions, atoms (in fact anything you can conceive of) and it’s very lifelike. While limited to the scope of your subconscious imagination, the lucid dream world is still a shocking place which truly has the capacity to mimic reality.

3. Lucid dreaming prompts us to question the nature of reality.

In questioning the nature of our perception, it naturally leads us to question the nature of reality — that is, the world as it exists around us. Some New Age philosophies suggest that consciousness creates reality, but I tend to believe it is the other way around. The universe was born first and did rather well for 12 billion years before the little critters on planet Earth developed consciousness. But why did it all happen? Does our very existence spring from another universe? Are we a hypothetical outcome — Schrodinger’s living cat? Or is ours the only universe, the only reality, in existence?

These are important theoretical questions but ones which can only really be pondered by stepping outside the box of everyday thinking. And lucid dreaming provides a useful platform. For instance, we can ask: where do our dreams take place? Why, when dreams are solely based on our conscious experiences, do we let them disobey the fundamental laws of cause and effect? What can dreams teach us about the nature of reality? And how can we use lucid dreaming as a lens on our conscious experience?

Of course we can have no definitive answers, all we can do is theorize. But I think it is very exciting to use lucid dreaming as a tool to do so.

4. Lucid dreaming is a direct line to the subconscious mind.

Eat your heart out Sigmund Freud. Lucid dreamers can literally talk to their own subconscious mind in the dreamscape.

I once had a nightmare, in which I was being flung by a dark pointy figure up and down a narrow hallway. I wasn’t lucid at first, although I was conscious enough to feel pain and each smack really hurt. After two or three smashes I had the conscious insight to ask whether I was dreaming. Of course I was. I didn’t waste any time; I marched up to the silhouette man and grab him by the shoulders.

“WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO ME!” I shouted. His aggression immediately turned to sadness and childish frustration. “I can’t reconcile this,” he said, and shoved a notepad in my hands. He has scrawled the words “be loved, love yourself”, referring to a philosophical debate I had been having earlier that day: Is it more important to love yourself, or love someone else?

Clearly, my conclusion was at odds with my subconscious. There was absolutely no symbolism required. My inner child was acting out with a massive tantrum — and demanded my attention. Yet it is only when lucid that I have the opportunity to resolve such issues face-to-face.

Instead of fearing the pointy figure or wanting to banish him, I now felt empathy for him. He hadn’t understood. So I explained my reasons as if he were a child. Draining away both physically and emotionally, the creature left and I woke up in awe of the childish element that arose from my subconscious self.

5. Lucid dreaming is a training ground for real life.

Being a virtual reality simulation, the lucid dream world is an ideal place to practice real life skills – from the perfect flying kick to playing classical piano.

Research has revealed that we can increase our procedural memory for fine muscle movements inside a lucid dream. So, after practicing flying kicks for half an hour in a lucid dream, your kicks would literally be better upon waking.

Likewise, in the book Exploring The World of Lucid Dreaming by Dr Stephen LaBerge and Howard Rheingold, a surgeon explains how, before going to sleep at night, he would review his surgical cases for the next day. Then he would become lucid in his dreams and practice them in precise detail. As a result, he was able to refine and polish his techniques and perform procedures much faster than the average surgeon. He credited his edge to lucid dreaming.

6. Lucid dreaming creates a natural high.

The moment when you recognize that you’re dreaming, it creates a rush of excitement. It’s when you realize that you are back in lucid land, where anything and everything is possible. This natural high stays with you throughout the dream and on waking. A deliciously memorable lucid dream has colored many of my waking days.

Whether you are a complete beginner or an expert oneironaut, we all relish the state of conscious dreaming and take away blissful new experiences almost every time it happens. Such dreams can be euphoric in nature and create memories and insights that will stay with you for the rest of your life. It’s probably one of the best natural highs we are capable of creating, in the same class as jumping out of a plane or falling in love.

7. Lucid dreaming helps you to grieve.

Often when we lose loved ones, we have the sense that there is some unfinished business. Whether the death comes suddenly without warning, or slowly and predictably, we would all take that opportunity to have another hour with the deceased. Depending on your beliefs, you may feel the deceased has messages for you (reflections after life is over) and you, too, may have messages for them (unresolved feelings of guilt or anger or simply how much you miss them). So, how do you resolve your unfinished business?

I don’t believe that spirits contact us from the afterlife, and the idea of contacting lost loved ones via psychic mediums is a sad state. (I used to believe; how painfully funny it is to look back at the messages I used to “make fit” with my reality. But no, after much experience and critical thinking, I strongly believe mediums are tricking their customers or tricking themselves – or both.) The idea of spirits appearing in our dreams is equally unsatisfying for me.

However, dreams of the dead do have a capacity for grief and healing. You just have to accept that the deceased are not actually visiting you — and that it’s just a part of your own subconscious mind playing a role. These dreams tend to occur naturally when you are grieving the loss of someone close to you; thoughts of them during the day will filter into your dreams. But if your loved one doesn’t appear to you at night, or you just miss them and want to give them a hug, then dreaming lucidly about them is a wonderful proposition.

Lucid dreams offer us the closure we need to overcome our grief and move on with our lives. That’s not to say we want to forget. A lucid experience can enable us to consciously visit any period in our past and re-live those memories; playtime with a childhood pet, conversations with a late parent, and intimacy with a lost partner are all ways to grieve and remember loved ones.

8. Lucid dreaming is like taking a creativity pill.

We all know that regular dreams can be a bizarre place of inspiration… and when conscious dreaming, we can actively seek out creative ideas and bring them back to the waking world.

Famous painters like Salvador Dali, William Blake and Paul Klee all created artwork inspired by their dreams.

If you’re seeking artistic inspiration while lucid, head into a gallery and study the images you find there. They may arise from your memory, subconscious creativity, or a combination of both. But best of all, they will contain elements of your conceptual understanding of the world, which can make for beautiful and baffling interpretations.

Equally, lucid dreams can give way to amazing musical inspiration. Composers like Mozart, Beethoven and Wagner all pointed to dreams as the source of their creativity. Dreams reveal our most creative side because of the free-flow of ideas arising from the subconscious mind, unhindered by the rational conscious.

9. Lucid dreaming can advance the human race.

I believe that if every human being became a frequent lucid dreamer starting tonight, our culture, art, technology, medicine, science and even religion would quickly develop in a whole new direction. Imagine if every inventor suddenly had a breakthrough lucid dream about a new invention? If every artist suddenly began producing subconsciously-inspired artwork? If every scientist could suddenly solve advanced problems that had previously left them stumped?

In short, if we all had access to lucid dreams and used them in a productive capacity, we would tap into greater power within. The entire human race would be enriched as a result, individually… and universally.

 

 

~via BodyMindSoulSpirit.com

TAMARA PEARSON: “13 Reasons Why We Hate Television”

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It’s not very meaningful

Television won’t bring you any of the change you want in your life or in the world. The Alternative Daily CEO Jake Carney commented that when he started this website, he didn’t turn a TV on for two years.

It promotes lazy thought

Television shows and advertising are aimed at the lowest common denominator. They recycle tired plot formulas that oversimplify characters, problems and the big issues. They promote easy and quick happiness (just buy a thing, just propose in a really clichéd way in public) and they rarely challenge viewers to think, criticize or question. Alternative Daily writer Megan Winkler commented that “most series really love characters who are self-destructive in one sense or the other. That’s a bummer. I’d like to see people recycling aluminum and plastic the way some writers recycle the same tired tropes again and again.”

It makes you eat unhealthy food

People tend to snack on unhealthy food while watching television. A professor of health sociology, Steve Gortmaker, noted that the advertising also “tends to increase intake of a range of unhealthy food products.”

It creates a world for you

“I hate the fact that I am being fed something by some Hollywood producer that probably makes a ton of money off me sitting on my ass, mouth wide open. Create your own world, create your own adventure instead,” Carney adds. When people watch television, they aren’t being mindful of themselves and their surroundings. Instead, they are attached to the story, visuals and sounds of the screen in front of them, he points out.

It promotes a sedentary lifestyle

According to author Bonny Rockette-Wagner, research indicates that we move even less while watching TV compared with other sedentary activities, like sitting at work. People watching television may not stand up for several hours, but even standing up for a minute every 20 minutes can help your body regulate important substances such as glucose and the hormone insulin.

It causes unrealistic expectations in relationships (and in most aspects of life)

The way television shows portray emergency rooms, police, romances, friendships and even weight-loss is unrealistic and can lead people to have false expectations in their own lives. “The more you believe in popular portrayals of romance on television, the less committed you may be to your real relationship,” the Huffington Post noted, based on research from the journal Mass Communication and Society.

It literally makes you dumber

People who watch more than three hours of TV per day over a period of 25 years were found to be more likely to perform poorly on various cognitive tests, researchers of another study found. Further, children under the age of two who watch television are likely to have decreased language development, according to David Hill, chairman of the American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Communications and Media. 

It promotes stereotypes and discrimination

From dating shows that objectify women to news shows with almost exclusively white male news anchors or young while blond female ones, to law and order shows where the criminals are destructive stereotypes of Latino and black criminals, television tends to reinforce racial and gender stereotypes, give voice to those who already have a disproportionate say in the world and ignore poverty and the working class altogether, instead of promoting human diversity. Even outside of the United States, American programming can dominate airtime, leaving little space for local identity, culture and issues.

It’s isolating

A few hours watching a movie with a partner or friends can be really nice, and even a bit of alone time with one’s favorite characters can be relaxing. But binge-watching can be a harmful addiction, an avoidance and distraction technique that is socially isolating.

There isn’t a lot of choice

There may be a lot of channels to choose from, but apart from the occasional good documentary or engaging historical drama, most of what airs on television is low quality, under-researched, badly written rubbish, leaving viewers with a false choice of many slightly varied types of crap.

It leaves you with less time for life

Everyone at The Alternative Daily agreed that too much television is a waste of time. A writer for The New York Times wrote in 1939, “TV will never be a serious competitor for radio because people must sit and keep their eyes glued on a screen; the average American family hasn’t time for it.”

How wrong they were! And I have to admit, I don’t understand how people who work one to two full-time jobs manage to squeeze in that average five hours a day of television. But they do, and while it makes sense that people who are exhausted find television an easier leisure activity than a trip to the park or cooking, moderation is key. Most of those five hours a day could be spent doing something much more rewarding, useful or truly relaxing.

It’s expensive

Americans spend more than $6 billion per year just paying for the electricity alone to power their television sets, according to Becoming Minimalist. And around $73 billion is spent on advertising every year in the United States. That’s more than the whole economies of many countries, just spent on manipulating people into buying stuff they don’t need and often things that objectively are bad for them.

It sets the bar low for who we look up to

Rather than admiring teachers, firefighters or other people dedicating their lives to helping others and to justice, a lot of people look up to the actors and actresses on television — the “celeb” culture. Idolizing these overpaid people for the most superficial reasons (who really knows them?) can be harmful to one’s self-esteem, with teenage girls in particular aiming to look like someone whose hair was professionally styled every 30 minutes.

We all need down time, time to relax and recharge and to process our day and our troubles. But you’re not processing much when you watch television, and there are lots of alternatives, such as a walk in the park, listening to or playing music, having a daydream (something that’s actually very creative), dancing, taking a bath or shower, getting a massage or having a cuddle, reading a book, taking part in a sport, walking a pet, having a chat over a hot chocolate and simple playing (yep, adults should do it too — it promotes curiosity). Mucking around with your photos, doing some craft or adult coloring, even finger-painting can be both good for your mind and relaxing.

—Tamara Pearson

 

 

 

http://www.TheAlternativeDaily.com