ALIYAH MARR: “Dark Night Of The Soul — Unraveling The Matrix”

I went through the most amazing depression since the beginning of the year. Then for a few days, the “sun came out”—I realized that I was finally able to see beauty and taste my food. Then I realized how long it had been since I last felt this way.

In that euphoric mood, I had clarity, purpose, reason, logic, and vision; all of which I have missed for almost three years now. I felt as if I came out from a long, dark tunnel into a bright sunny day.

Depression is physical, not emotional, and certainly not mental.

We tend to think that depression is emotional and we all think that it can be changed by changing your personal thoughts, but the state of depression is a symptom of the long-held and trapped—or frozen—energy in our body.

Energy as matter, trapped in the physical form, must go through a sublimation process in order for the body/soul of the individual to move to a higher vibratory state or consciousness.

Depression cannot be changed by changing your thoughts. It is too deep; it is embedded codes/patterns/programming that is held in your body.

I now understand that emotional depression is caused by a wave of transformative, evolutionary energy that hits the physical body and “squeezes” it until it releases codes and programs held in the cells. The codes trapped in the cells release energy in the form of emotion—this emotion is dark, slow-moving, and feels toxic as it is released.

One feels depression because the trapped codes expressed as emotion when they come out and this emotion is of a very low vibration. But because the codes are being released (into the energy of emotion), they are actually at a higher vibration than when they were trapped; they are on the way out of the body, on the way to being released back into raw energy.

The analogy that comes to mind is that of the natural states of water: in the physical form, the codes are frozen, like ice. To release the water in the ice back to its liquid form, you have to heat it until it hits the higher vibratory state of water (emotion); finally, if you heat it enough—raising its vibration—the water becomes steam (mental) and floats away.

ICE (physical) —-> WATER (emotional) —–> STEAM (mental) —-> released energy

To release energy from matter involves a reversal of the manifestation process. The book, The Tarot Key, Unlock the Secrets of Your Soul, shows how creation works through our bodies—the four states of the energy-to-matter manifestation process are analogous to the four classical elements:

ENERGY ———————————————-> MATTER

FIRE ——> AIR ————–> WATER ——–> EARTH

INTENT–> THOUGHTS –> EMOTIONS –> REALITY

In order to unravel the codes, you have to reverse the process, and in doing so, you naturally go through each of the levels of vibratory awareness. This means that, as they release, the codes must first go through the emotional body (registering as depression), then they hit the mental body as confusing, uncontrollable thoughts, and finally, when those are released, they evaporate.

MATTER ———————————————-> ENERGY

EARTH ——> WATER ————–> AIR ——–> FIRE

EARTH————-> EMOTIONS ——————> THOUGHTS ————> INTENT (ENERGY)

Physical Pain—–> Fear-based Emotions ——> Mental Confusion ——> Pure Energy (available for the application of your intent)

See this video, Unraveling the Matrix to see what I mean.

 

This morning another wave of “depression” hit me again. I remembered a technique I used some years ago with physical pain: I mentally “turn my cells sideways” like vertical blinds so that they are not hit broadside by the energy wave. This helps reduce emotional pain as well as physical pain.

 

About the author: Aliyah Marr is an experienced creative life coach and author of Unplug from the Matrix and The Avatars of Eden. Transform your life; become the you you always intended to be. https://www.parallelmindzz.com

 

~via In5D.com

 

Photo by Ascension Avatar – 6-22-2019 – “Unraveling the Sun” 

 

CAITLIN JOHNSTONE: “The U.S. Army Asked Twitter How Service Has Impacted People — And The Answers Were Gut-Wrenching”

May 27, 2019

After posting a video of a young recruit talking to the camera about how service allows him to better himself “as a man and a warrior”, the US Army tweeted, “How has serving impacted you?”

As of this writing, the post has over 5,300 responses. Most of them are heartbreaking.

“My daughter was raped while in the army,” said one responder. “They took her to the hospital where an all male staff tried to convince her to give the guy a break because it would ruin his life. She persisted. Wouldn’t back down. Did a tour in Iraq. Now suffers from PTSD.”

“I’ve had the same nightmare almost every night for the past 15 years,” said another.

Tweet after tweet after tweet, people used the opportunity that the Army had inadvertently given them to describe how they or their loved one had been chewed up and spit out by a war machine that never cared about them. This article exists solely to document a few of the things that have been posted in that space, partly to help spread public awareness and partly in case the thread gets deleted in the interests of “national security”. Here’s a sampling in no particular order:

Someone I loved joined right out of high school even though I begged him not to. Few months after his deployment ended, we reconnected. One night, he told me he loved me and then shot himself in the head. If you’re gonna prey on kids for imperialism, at least treat their PTSD.”

~

“After I came back from overseas I couldn’t go into large crowds without a few beers in me. I have nerve damage in my right ear that since I didn’t want to look weak after I came back I lied to the VA rep. My dad was exposed to agent orange which destroyed his lungs, heart, liver and pancreas and eventually killing him five years ago. He was 49, exposed at a post not Vietnam, and will never meet my daughter my nephew. I still drink to much and I crowds are ok most days but I have to grocery shop at night and can’t work days because there is to many ppl.”

~

“The dad of my best friend when I was in high school had served in the army. He struggled with untreated PTSD & severe depression for 30 years, never told his family. Christmas eve of 2010, he went to their shed to grab the presents & shot himself in the head. That was the first funeral I attended where I was actually told the cause of death & the reasons surrounding it. I went home from the service, did some asking around, & found that most of the funerals I’ve attended before have been caused by untreated health issues from serving.”

~

“My dad was drafted into war and was exposed to agent orange. I was born w multiple physical/neurological disabilities that are linked back to that chemical. And my dad became an alcoholic with ptsd and a side of bipolar disorder.”

~

“i met this guy named christian who served in iraq. he was cool, had his own place with a pole in the living room. always had lit parties. my best friend at the time started dating him so we spent a weekend at his crib. after a party, 6am, he took out his laptop. he started showing us some pics of his time in the army. pics with a bunch of dudes. smiling, laughing. it was cool. i was drunk and didn’t care. he started showing us pics of some little kids. after a while, his eyes went completely fucking dark. i was like man, dude’s high af. he very calmly explained to us that all of those kids were dead ‘but that’s what war was. dead kids and nothing to show for it but a military discount’. christian killed himself 2 months later.”

~

“I didn’t serve but my dad did. In Vietnam. It eventually killed him, slowly, over a couple of decades. When the doctors were trying to put in a pacemaker to maybe extend his life a couple of years, his organs were so fucked from the Agent Orange, they disintegrated to the touch. He died when I was ten. He never saw me graduate high school. He never saw me get my first job or buy my first car. He wasn’t there. But hey! Y’all finally paid out 30k after another vet took the VA to the Supreme Court, so. You know. It was cool for him.”

~

“Chronic pain with a 0% disability rating (despite medical discharge) so no benefits, and anger issues that I cope with by picking fistfights with strangers.”

~

“My parents both served in the US Army and what they got was PTSD for both of them along with anxiety issues. Whenever we go out in public and sit down somewhere my dad has to have his back up against the wall just to feel a measure of comfort that no one is going to sneak up on him and kill him and and walking up behind either of them without announcing that you’re there is most likely going to either get you punch in the face or choked out.”

~

“Many of my friends served. All are on heavy antidepressant/anxiety meds, can’t make it through 4th of July or NYE, and have all dealt with heavy substance abuse problems before and after discharge. And that’s on top of one crippled left hand, crushed vertebra, and GSWs.”

~

“Left my talented and young brother a broken and disabled man who barely leaves the house. Left my mother hypervigilant & terrified due to the amount of sexual assault & rape covered up and looked over by COs. Friend joined right out if HS, bullet left him paralyzed neck down.”

~

“My cousin went to war twice and came back with a drug addiction that killed him. My other cousin could never get paid on time and when he left they tried to withhold his pay.”

~

“It’s given me a fractured spine, TBI, combat PTSD, burn pit exposure, and a broken body with no hope of getting better. Not even medically retired for a fractured spine. WTF.”

~

“Y’all killed my father by failing to provide proper treatments after multiple tours.”

~

“Everyone I know got free PTSD and chemical exposure and a long engagement in their efforts to have the US pay up for college tuition. Several lives ruined. No one came out better. Thank god my recruiter got a DUI on his way to get me or I would be dead or worse right now.”

~

“I have ptsd and still wake up crying at night. Also have a messed up leg that I probably will have to deal with the rest of my life. Depression. Anger issues.”

~

“My grandfather came back from Vietnam with severe PTSD, tried to drown it in alcohol, beat my father so badly and so often he still flinches when touched 50 years later. And I grew up with an emotionally scarred father with PTSD issues of his own because of it. Good times.”

~

“Hmmm. Let’s see. I lost friends, have 38 inches of scars, PTSD and a janky arm and hand that don’t work.”

~

“my grandpa served in vietnam from when he was 18-25. he’s 70 now and every night he still has nightmares where he stands up tugging at the curtains or banging on the walls screaming at the top of his lungs for someone to help him. he refuses to talk about his time and when you mention anything about the war to him his face goes white and he has a panic attack. he cries almost every day and night and had to spend 10 years in a psychiatric facility for suicidal ideations from what he saw there.”

~

“My best friend joined the Army straight out of high school because his family was poor & he wanted a college education. He served his time & then some. Just as he was ready to retire he was sent to Iraq. You guys sent him back in a box. It destroyed his children.”

~

“Well, my father got deployed to Iraq and came back a completely different person. Couldn’t even work the same job he had been working 20 years before that because of his anxiety and PTSD. He had nightmares, got easily violent and has terrible depression. But the army just handed him pills, now he is 100% disabled and is on a shit ton of medication. He has nightmares every night, paces the house barely sleeping, checking every room just to make sure everyone’s safe. He’s had multiple friends commit suicide.”


“Father’s a disabled Vietnam veteran who came home with severe PTSD and raging alcoholism. VA has continuously ignored him throughout the years and his medical needs and he receives very little compensation for all he’s gone through. Thanks so much!!”

~

“I was #USNavy, my husband was #USArmy, he served in Bosnia and Iraq and that nice, shy, funny guy was gone, replaced with a withdrawn, angry man…he committed suicide a few years later…when I’m thanked for my service, I just nod.”

~

“I’m permanently disabled because I trained through severe pain after being rejected from the clinic for ‘malingering.’ Turns out my pelvis was cracked and I ended up having to have hip surgery when I was 20 years old.”

~

“My brother went into the Army a fairly normal person, became a Ranger (Ft. Ord) & came out a sociopath. He spent the 1st 3 wks home in his room in the dark, only coming out at night when he thought we were asleep. He started doing crazy stuff. Haven’t seen him since 1993.”

~

“Recently attended the funeral for a west point grad with a 4yr old and a 7yr old daughter because he blew his face off to escape his ptsd but thats nothing new.”


Take an additional $15 off $150 purchase. Use code: FIFTEEN

~

“I don’t know anyone in my family who doesn’t suffer from ptsd due to serving. One is signed off sick due to it & thinks violence is ok. Another (navy) turned into a psycho & thought domestic violence was the answer to his wife disobeying his orders.”

~

“My dad served during vietnam, but after losing close friends and witnessing the killing of innocents by the U.S., he refused to redeploy. He has suffered from PTSD ever since. The bravest thing he did in the army was refuse to fight any longer, and I’m so proud of him for that.”

~

“My best friend from high school was denied his mental health treatment and forced to return to a third tour in Iraq, despite having such deep trauma that he could barely function. He took a handful of sleeping pills and shot himself in the head two weeks before deploying.”

~

“Bad back, hips, and knees. Lack of trust, especially when coming forward about sexual harassment. Detachment, out of fear of losing friends. Missed birthdays, weddings, graduations, and funerals. I get a special license plate tho.”

~

“My son died 10 months ago. He did 3 overseas tours. He came back with severe mental illness.”

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“I’m still in and I’m in constant pain and they recommended a spinal fusion when I was 19. Y’all also won’t update my ERB so I can’t use the education benefits I messed myself up for.”

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“My dad served two tours in middle east and his personality changes have affected my family forever. VA ‘counseling’ has a session limit and doesn’t send you to actual psychologists. Military service creates a mental health epidemic it is then woefully unequipped to deal with.”

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“My best childhood friend lost his mind after his time in the marines and now he lives in a closet in his mons house and can barely hold a conversation with anyone. He only smokes weed and drinks cough syrup that he steals since he can’t hold a job.”

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“After coming back from Afghanistan…..Matter fact I don’t even want to talk about it. Just knw that my PTSD, bad back, headaches, chronic pain, knee pain, and other things wishes I would have NEVER signed that contract. It was NOT worth the pain I’ll endure for the rest of life.”

~

“My cousin served and came back only to be diagnosed with schizophrenia and ptsd. There were nights that he would lock himself in the bathroom and stay in the corner because he saw bodies in the bathtub. While driving down the highway, he had another episode and drove himself into a cement barrier, engulfing his Jeep in flames and burning alive. My father served as well and would never once speak of what he witnessed and had to do. He said it’s not something that any one person should ever be proud of.”


“I was sexually assaulted by a service member at 17 when I visited my sister on her base, then again at 18. My friend got hooked on k2 and died after the va turned him away for mental health help. Another friend serving was exploited sexually by her co and she was blamed for it.”

~

“I spent ten years in the military. I worked 15 hour days to make sure my troops were taken care of. In return for my hard work I was rewarded with three military members raping me. I was never promoted to a rank that made a difference. And I have an attempt at suicide. Fuck you!”

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“I actually didn’t get around to serving because I was sexually assaulted by three of my classmates during a military academy prep program. They went to the academies and are still active duty officers. I flamed out of the program and have PTSD.”

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“My father’s successful military career taught him that he’s allowed to use violence to make people do what he wants because America gave him that power.”

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“While I was busy framing ‘soliders and families first’ (lol) propaganda posters, my best friend went to ‘Iraqistan’ but he didn’t come back. He returned alive, to be sure, but he was no longer the fun, carefree, upbeat person he’d previously been.”

~

“My husband is a paraplegic and can’t control 3/4 of his body now. Me, I’ve got PTSD, an anxiety disorder, two messed up knees, depression, a bad back, tinnitus, and chronic insomnia. I wish both had never served.”

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“This is one of the most heartbreaking threads I’ve ever read.”

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“I am so sorry. The way we fail our service members hurts my heart. My grandfather served in the Korean War and had nightmares until his death at 91 years old. We must do better.”

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“My Army story is that when I was in high school, recruiters were there ALL the time- at lunch, clubs, etc.- targeting the poor kids at school. I didn’t understand it until now. You chew people who have nothing at home up and spit them out.”

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“I was thinking about enlisting until I saw this thread. Hard pass.”

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“I hope to god that the Army has enough guts to read these and realize how badly our servicepeople are being treated. Thank you and god bless you to all of you in this thread, and your loved ones who are suffering too.”

~

There are many, many more.

 

~via WakingTimes.com

CONSCIOUS REMINDER: “If Your Body Is Showing These Warning Signs, You Might Be Retaining Negative Energy”

Negative energy is everywhere around us, such as in people, nursing homes, cars, buildings, airports, . Sensitive people will feel it more.

10 Warning Signs Your Body Is Retaining Negative Energy:

 

Headaches.

A lot of us get dull headaches when we are confronted with some negative energy. The reasons and causes of headaches may be various, but when we are not able to explain it or deal with something weighing on us, negative energies can probably be the cause.

Tension and restlessness.

Negative energies in our bodies manifest as tension. Our mind is full of negative thoughts, so we feel angry and sad. We also feel restless. However, if we take proper care of ourselves, it may help us a lot in getting rid of negativities and move ourselves in positive directions.

Stomach pain.

This is another probable sign that negative energy is present in our body or also our environment. Stomach aches are a milder sign of dealing with negativity. We can feel stressed about a particular situation or hold tension in our belly. Stomach aches can tell us a lot more than only telling us we have caught some stomach virus or the food we have eaten was terrible.

Feeling physically recoiled.

A lot of us may sometimes feel physically recoiled from some negative energy. In fact, this experience or symptom is the one which we will notice when we confront with negative energies in someone else, or another thing and place.

Adrenal fatigue.

Our adrenal glands are helping us respond to anxiety and stress; however, dealing with great amounts of negative energies in our body and our environment, the adrenal glands may get overtaxed. When we are tired, unable to sleep or to stay asleep, overwhelmed, achy and frazzled, we may pay closer attention as all these are signs of dealing with so-called adrenal fatigue.

Difficulties in breathing.

This may be a sign that something is not good when it comes to the energy in our body. We hold grief in our lungs, so when we feel grief, the emotion stays hold in our lungs. This means that when there is grief in our lungs, we may have a hard time to breathe as we are overwhelmed by the emotion.

Chronic pain.

Negativities can even manifest themselves in the form of chronic pain. So, negative energy can cause constriction and tension in our muscles. The constant stress will take its toll on our body, leading to physical pain and fatigue.

Depression symptoms.

Depression can be another condition negative energies manifest themselves in. Depression can make it hard for us to feel more positive as to how this condition works. It is not a surprise that depression is able to cause negative energies to enter our body, which is quite profoundly embedded in our daily experiences.

Feeling a little bit ‘off.’

When we feel that we are ‘off,’ we might have to think crucially and self-reflect about what happens in our life or what the cause of feeling that way is. While we look to fix huge problems, we miss the small problems that are building over time, every day. Negative energies can affect our health and bump into our relationships.

Dealing with exhaustion or confusion.

This is another physical sign that we deal with negative or also called vampire energy. When we talk with other people, they may make us feel upset, tired, confused, sick, nauseous, or everything else which is negative. That’s why we have to clear negative energies and keep going.

 

~via ConsciousReminder.com

CONSCIOUS REMINDER: “Supercharge Your Dopamine Levels And Never Feel Sad, Stressed Or Depressed Again”

Did you know that we have chemicals in our brain that make us feel good? One of the most important is dopamine — also known as the ‘feel good chemical’.

Having reduced levels of dopamine can lead to adverse effects like depression and negativity.

But don’t worry, there are natural ways to increase your dopamine so you can experience a more constant level of happiness. Best of all, the following techniques don’t involve medications.

1. Exercise.

Exercise can boost your levels of endorphins, serotonin and dopamine, which will not only strengthen your muscles, but will help reduce your stress. The best bit? It works with any kind of exercise – just as long as you get moving!

2. Avoid addictions.

While addictions may provide an instant boost of pleasure, it isn’t long-lasting. What eventually happens is that your base levels of dopamine will actually decrease and you will need your addiction more often. Therefore, it can beneficial to avoid addictions and focus on things that give you calm and peace.

3. Detoxify.

Toxins and unhealthy bacteria can halt your body producing dopamine, so make sure to consistently detoxify your body.

4. Increase Tyrosine.

This amino acid is one of the most important for the production of dopamine. Make sure to consume almonds, bananas, dark chocolate and green tea.

5. Listen to music.

Music actually increases your feel good chemicals, so make sure to regularly listen to music you enjoy.

6. Organize your life.

When you complete a goal, dopamine levels are increased. Therefore, write down your tasks, even small ones, and tick them off once you complete them. Every time you finish a task, you’ll experience a small rush of dopamine for completing your goal.

7. Be creative.

Being creative releases dopamine. The great thing is creativity can be found in a whole range of tasks from writng to singing to dancing.

8. Get a streak going.

This is a visual display of the number of times you achieve something. Again, by displaying things you achieve, your brain will recognize that you’re completing goals which will increase dopamine.

9. Supplement.

These are the supplements that can boost dopamine levels:

  • Curcumin — found in turmeric
  • Ginkgo Biloba
  • Acetyl-L-Tyrosine
  • L-Theanine  — found in green tea


10. Meditate.

This works differently compared to exercise.

It will make you more calm and relaxed, which will enable you to reduce stress.

 

~via ConsciousReminder.com

DEJAN DAVCEVSKI: “5 Things Each Person Can Do To Help People Struggling With Mental Health”

Ascension Avatar note: I flip-flopped on whether to post this since it is a simplistic ‘3D’ perspective without touching on the roots of what we could term ‘mental health issues’… many of which could actually be parasitic entities or mind control implants, unhealed past-life trauma, or something as common as ascension awakening symptoms. Discernment is the key and in my opinion “there’s no healing like self-healing.” 🙂

 

Mental health is as important as any other type of health. Mental illness is a global issue. People start to see mental illnesses as a real problem but many still have prejudices about what mental illnesses really are.

Just because something can’t be seen it does not mean it’s not real. Someone struggling with clinical depression needs care and support as much someone with broken arm. Maybe even more. Imagine being sick and having nobody around you to help you heal.

My point is that people struggling with mental health issues usually struggle alone because people around them can’t see their problem and can’t understand their pain. But they don’t have to. There are ways you can help people struggling with mental health.

In this modern society with advanced technology there are countless ways to get to the right information, to educate yourself and find ways to give a helping hand. There are countless ways to make people connect, share and help each other.

Depression, panic attacks and anxiety are a global epidemic. There are certainly people around you who suffer in silence. Maybe it’s even you. But if you know someone who struggles with mental health, here are 5 ways you can help them.

5 Ways You Can Help People Struggling With Mental Health:

 

1. Be considerate and friendly.

People who struggle with mental health need love and support. The last thing they need is to feel isolated and alone. You should listen to them, try to understand them and be compassionate about their inner struggles. Don’t try to push them, just be a friend. All they need is a friend who they can open up to. In fact, genuine connection is probably the biggest thing that can help them.

2. Look at their health issue as a real problem because it is.

Whatever they struggle with, depression, panic attacks, anxiety, or some other mental disorder, see it as a real illness. Just because it’s not visible it doesn’t mean it is not affecting their inner chemistry and emotions. People who struggle with mental health want you to acknowledge their pain. They want you to see that they are struggling inside, because they feel like nobody understands they are in pain, and yet, they need help.

3. Read and educate.

In today’s age there is no excuse to not know about mental disorders. The information and knowledge is everywhere. It’s literally available to you in a couple of clicks away on a device that’s inside your pocket. So at least try to educate yourself about what these people who you care about are struggling with. Read about what’s the possible cause, what’s the possible fix, how they feel. It will give you bigger compassion.

4. Give a sincere advice.

If you really care about someone who struggles with mental health you will probably try to help them by giving them advices. If they are sad, you’ll tell them to not be sad. If they worry too much you’ll tell them not to worry. If they have anxiety you’ll ask them to stop feeling anxious. But the problem is they would have done it if they could. The advice should be from the heart. Tell them how you dealt with anxiety yourself when you felt anxious.

5. Show them ways that can fix their problem for good.

A couple of years ago mental health might have been something that not many people understood or were aware of. But today the awareness is growing and there are countless options for help and therapy. The internet itself offers many ways to come in contact with professionals who can personally help with mental health, or at least show techniques through articles and videos.

 

~via LifeCoachCode.com