LISA RENEE (Time Shift Blog): “Social Competencies”

To develop and support Coherence and congruence in directing personal energies towards building an integrated Lightbody, and simultaneously, to define overall supportive energies within coherent systems, it is necessary to establish agreements towards personal goals for reaching a higher order of competencies. These ranges of competencies can be described as; emotional competencies, mental competencies, communication competencies, spiritual competencies, as well as relationship and social competencies.

Social competencies are required in building Coherent Systems involving group consciousness, which are intrinsic to the development of comprehending psychological and emotional factors that may impact the overall social group and influence the individual selves in the group. It is productive for all people to develop social competencies to be aware of how to identify and neutralize negative impacts that may arise in the social dynamics that mirror reflections within any type of group, community or organization. Seeing these mirrored reflections in every day life supports self-mastery skills that help to define basic competencies needed to become increasingly coherent. Becoming coherent is a necessary requirement in order to connect and communicate deeply with one’s inner spirit, and these skills are not taught in the current educational model stemming from the Controller Pillars of Society. The biggest challenge of any coherent system is to retrain the group to not think of competencies in terms of rank, status or power, but as a method to obtain personal goals of self-mastery and self-achievement that cannot be compared to anyone else. Thus, the group must be hyper aware of the pitfalls of judgment, comparison and putting others beneath or above you. We must learn to retrain our mind to be with others as unified equals, while being able to recognize specific competencies that yield no value difference, but may define a role for that person to be productive to support the group’s overall goal towards building more coherent systems of function.

In order for us to commit to any kind of group goal with a continual incentive, we must have personal resonance or feelings of inspired purpose with the group promotion of those same goals. In any kind of social construct, if the group goals are not important for an individual, he or she will lack coherence with the group and have no incentive to be responsible towards collaborating with others in the group towards achieving that goal. The lack of energetic Resonance clearly means it is the wrong group consciousness or social connection for that person. There is no right or wrong in personal resonance, but it is the responsibility for each person to figure out what their core resonances are, and to choose things that support that resonance. Understanding our personal resonance comes from our developed self-awareness. If we do not know ourselves well, we will not know our own Resonances. If a person in the group refuses to honor or respect the group goals this will create an increased lack of coherence. This is what breaks down trust and breaks down the strength of the overall system, which eventually must be corrected to achieve rebalancing.

The Ascension Cycle is about shifting out of old paradigms of control and manipulation that are commonly used to exert power plays in social situations, as these power plays are used to enforce hierarchical methods to define value systems based on rank and file. To combat these common negative ego patterns we have seen enforced in society, family and in the world at large, we must dismantle our instinctual desires, which overlay controlling behaviors that attempt to unconsciously or consciously reinforce these beliefs assigning power based on ranks and hierarchies. True Leadership is about embodying the role of being in service to the whole, serving the health of the greater good for each part that is included in the complexity of any kind of unified group or organized system. Each person has the personal power to choose to develop self-leadership, which takes on another dimension in service to the whole. Organized systems are needed to direct project goals and require an agreement of Unified Cooperation from the group of people involved, in order to achieve that higher goal. Without unified cooperation, there is no accountability or enough energetic Coherence present in the group field, which influences the larger goal towards becoming unsuccessful or ineffective.

Thus, on the path of integrated Ascension, which naturally increases inner energetic coherence, we must take responsibility for our behaviors, actions and choices. This is especially magnified while participating in group projects, group goals or communities, and we must honestly decide if we are willing to undergo these challenges in order to increase our personal competencies. The choice of reeducating oneself into supporting humanitarian goals and being willing to explore the higher concepts of learning required to achieve those goals, are the personal responsibility of each individual during this intense time of spiritual ascension. We can choose to retreat into isolation while blaming everything and everyone around us for the negativity that we feel, or we can stop feeling bitter and realize that we are interconnected with group consciousness, whether we like it or not.

To find our way through the insanity of the psychological control and Emotional Manipulation, we must remove these Negative Ego beliefs, biases and divisive attitudes from our own behavior. As we get spiritually stronger and clearer, we refuse to succumb to the reptilian order, overlaid to reinforce social structures based on fear that are designed to manifest the consciousness enslavement of the entire planet.

How do we as human beings start to practice new standards of behavior and implement these paradigm shifts in our day-to-day lives? The first step is to establish goals that reeducate people to re-think their ingrained attitudes and automated belief systems that have influenced their thoughts and behaviors into promoting fear-based thought forms. When we are paralyzed in fear and confusion, we will use control and manipulation of circumstances and people, in order to relieve the internal pressure of our anxiety.

When making the paradigm shift from the individualistic and self-absorbed ways of thinking and behaving, into supporting the higher good, we will naturally be pulled into circumstances to find coherence within group consciousness. As we evolve towards Group Consciousness, in order to help define personal competencies, while participating in a group, a model must be provided that describes these higher concepts and guidelines of coherent group behavior. Those guidelines include setting new standards for defining certain qualities of thought, behavior and actions, not only as a personal achievement, but to be held accountable for those behaviors by the group witness. As an example, a group agreement may include the practices of loving compassion or harmless interactions with all people devoid of religious or spiritual rhetoric, as one goal in modeling higher concepts of personal behavior that help to grow and support humanitarianism. How well each person in the group can adhere to that group agreement, is helpful to define competencies for each person that has made that agreement while participating in the group. It gives the opportunity to actually practice and model that higher standard of spiritually beneficial and positive behavior in one’s self, while reflecting that piece to others. As the capacity for personal Coherence increases, this serves to strengthen the group agreement, which allows for the potential increase of energetic Coherence for the entire system, to be greatly multiplied.

Ethical Behaviors and Attitudes

In the process of personal development and in the strengthening of one’s moral character, Humility takes on a moral and ethical dimension which cultivates virtues in every area of our lives. “True humility” is distinctly different from “false humility” which consists of deprecating one’s own sanctity, gifts, talents, and accomplishments for the sake of receiving praise, attention or adulation from others.

In this context genuine humility comprises the following behaviors and attitudes:

  • Submitting to God Source as the highest authority to which one gives consent in your actions, words and deeds.
  • Recognizing Virtues and talents that others possess as it is and not envious of those talents, particularly if recognizing those people that may have skill sets that may currently surpass one’s own skill level. Giving due respect or honor of that purpose and when required, discerning when it is important to listen or when to take direction, depending on assessing the current circumstances. Every person has value and spiritual purpose, whether that purpose is actualized in the personality or not, and that potential is up to the person to cultivate a spiritually Krystic infused personality or Christ mind.
  • Recognizing the limits of one’s talents, ability, or authority; and, not reaching for what is beyond practical reality in terms of fantasies, embellishments or magical thinking. This is the difference of being honest when assessing a skill, Personal Competency, or proficiency level. An example, would you refer to yourself as an Olympic Gold swimmer when you are casual swimmer at the community pool? An honest and humble person would state the accurate facts of conditions in the moment as an true representation.
  • This is a part of knowing one self and being authentic and true to yourself, not needing competition with others, but recognizing those skills or proficiencies in people around you that may inspire you or help you to become a better or improved person. Finding value in a person’s proficiencies or recognizing those skills needed in a group setting that are required to support a larger group purpose or serving humanitarian objectives.
  • Humility is a potential part of temperance because temperance includes all those virtues that restrain reactions from our uncontrolled desires. Humility is a required discipline of restraining the lower appetites of impulsivity by refocusing negative emotions. Lack of Impulse Control means that we are easily consumed and controlled by darkness. When we apply humility to the circumstances it helps to refocus our impulses into more productive spiritually healthy behaviors. Humility is defined as, “A quality by which a person considering his own defects has a humble opinion of himself and willingly submits himself to God and to others for God’s sake.” St. Bernard defines it as, “A virtue by which a man knowing himself as he truly is, abases himself to the greater good. Christ is the ultimate definition of Humility.”

 

(Source: Ascension Glossary – Personal Competency)

 

~via EnergeticSynthesis.com – Time Shift Blog – posted April 30, 2019

LIVE BOLD & BLOOM: “12 Of The Most Important Values To Live By”

What values are important to a life well-lived?

What do you want to be known for? What qualities do you admire in others and work to cultivate in yourself?

And how do those qualities reflect your core beliefs?

Your life values are those that, once you identify them, help you with decision-making and provide the building blocks for your character — specifically the one you want to have.

For example, if one of your top value in life is courage, you’ll likely seek out new challenges so you can act in spite of the fear that comes when you’re faced with the possibility of failure or rejection.

And if forgiveness has recently become one of your values to live by, you’ll want to remind yourself of your new commitment when you’re about to spend time with someone who has hurt you in the past.

But what is the point of identifying your values, and how do they contribute to your growth and happiness?

To answer this question, we’re exploring 12 of the most important values in life and showing how they influence everything you do.

But before we do that, it makes sense to explain what values are in the first place.

What Are Values in Life?

Values are about what you consider important to the life you want to live. They inform your priorities and, when practiced consistently, form the character you want to have.

They’re rooted in your core beliefs about what makes for a life well-lived and about the behavior you want to model for others (including children if you have them).

Shared values are the basis for a common code – a value-based compass – that speeds up decision-making and unites those who share that code.

By expressing those values, the common code articulates different aspects of the shared mission and becomes the key motivator for those who share it.

You can take each of the following examples of values in life to create a code or motto that motivates you to practice that value every day, so it will become second nature when it’s most needed.

12 Most Important Values To Life By

 

1. Courage

Courage is about doing what you believe needs to be done — not in the absence of fear but in spite of it.

You might feel disinclined to offer a genuine apology out of fear that the other will reject it, but courage will help you apologize anyway, because it’s the right thing to do, out of respect for the one you hurt or offended. Whether they accept your apology or not is their business.

Courage requires a step outside of your comfort zone. If you have no fear, you don’t need courage, but when something you know you have to do makes you feel sick inside, courage is what makes you do that thing anyway.

Courage code: “I do what needs to be done, even if fear comes along for the ride.”

2. Kindness

Kindness is about treating others the way you want to be treated.

It’s more than just holding your tongue when you’re tempted to say something unkind; kindness looks for ways to make life better for others. It takes delight in lifting others up and reminding them they’re not alone, invisible, or insignificant.

Kindness and compassion are closely related; the latter involves the readiness to see a situation from someone else’s perspective and to give them the benefit of the doubt. It also takes into consideration what the other person has gone through and chooses to respond with kindness rather than anger or vengefulness.

Both demonstrate at least a subliminal appreciation for the connectedness of all living beings; when you show kindness and compassion to others, you benefit (at least) as much as they do.

Kindness to yourself is also important, and it’s the basis for self-care. Don’t forget to be as kind to yourself as you want others to be.

Schedule time each day for reasonable and thoughtful self-care, and practice mindfulness to be fully present for it. In practicing kindness to yourself, you also make yourself better able to render kindness to others.

Kindness code: “I treat others as I want to be treated — with thoughtfulness, patience, and respect.”

3. Patience

When someone is pushing your buttons, taking your time or attention away from something you want to finish, or making your life harder in some way, you practice patience by putting yourself in the others’ shoes, trying to see the situation from their perspective, and responding with kindness and respect.

No one wants to be treated like an inconvenience or a burden, and sometimes your priorities have to change to make room for something (or someone) more important or more likely to help you grow.

Patience code: “No matter how I feel when someone interrupts me or gets in my way, I always treat them with the same patience I hope for from others when necessity compels me to interrupt them or get in their way.”

4. Integrity

Integrity is about acting and speaking in accordance with your beliefs.

If you say one thing but do the opposite, witnesses to this contradiction aren’t likely to recognize you as a person of integrity. They’re more likely to accuse you of hypocrisy.

Though you may not be fully conscious of the disagreement between your words and actions, if you believe one thing but your actions profess a contradictory belief, you might feel a growing unease and unhappiness with the way you’re acting.

It doesn’t feel right. And you’re faced with a choice: either change your belief, or change your actions.

Integrity code: “What I believe is made clear by what I say and do.”

5. Gratitude / Appreciation

When gratitude is a core belief, you make time for it every day. You prioritize both feeling gratitude and expressing it — in your thoughts, in the words you speak or write, and in your attitude and actions.

You might create the habit of writing a daily gratitude list. And if you recognize the importance of emotion to the fullest experience of gratitude, you’ll likewise place a high value on a daily mindfulness practice.

Showing appreciation to others for their words and actions is also essential to making this a core value. Just as you appreciate it when others thank you for a job well done, for a thoughtful gift, or for rendering the help they needed, others appreciate that recognition too.

And far too often, we act as though others must already know how much we appreciate them. Don’t assume that they do; make sure of it.

Gratitude code: “In the morning, throughout the day, and in the evening, I feel and express gratitude for the good things in my life. And I make sure everyone who has done something good for me knows I appreciate them for it.”

6. Forgiveness

Forgiveness is about letting go of anger and resentment toward those who have hurt or offended you.

You’re not saying what they did was okay or not a big deal; you’re acknowledging that what they did was hurtful but choosing to forgive them in order to be free of the anger and resentment (toward them) that are making you miserable.

In forgiving them, you take back your power and choose happiness and peace of soul for yourself, even if the one who hurt you has never shown the slightest hint of remorse.

Everyone has a capacity for forgiveness — just as everyone has the capacity to hurt others with their words and actions — but not everyone has cultivated a habit of forgiveness.

We learn to be more forgiving by forgiving more. If you write morning pages, add a short list of people you forgive, adding what you forgive them for and something you appreciate about each person.

Forgiveness code: “I forgive those who have hurt me, because I know I’ve made mistakes and hurt people, too, and I want to be free of this anger and resentment. I choose freedom, and I choose to genuinely want (and work for) the good of those who’ve hurt me.”

7. Love

Love sees the good in everyone, and it wants good things for them. You may not always know what’s best for someone else, but if you love them, you want their ultimate happiness, and you want to see them grow.

You recognize that no one reaches adulthood with their character fixed and unchangeable; we’re all a work in progress. Things your 20-year-old self would say might appall your 40-year-old self. It’s part of being human if you’re a human that continues to grow.

Did someone you love do terrible things in their 20’s or 30’s — things they would never do now (in their mid-40’s)?

Forgive them for not knowing better before they learned whatever stopped them from doing those terrible things. And forgive yourself for not knowing that human beings are all capable of terrible things — just as we’re also capable of growth.

When you love someone, you don’t base that love on the kind of person they were ten or twenty years ago, or on the person, you hope they become or that you wish they were. Your love tells them, “You are enough — just as you are today.”

You recognize that their beliefs and behavior may change as they grow, but since your love doesn’t depend on what they believe or on whether you agree on everything, your love doesn’t lessen with time and with the challenges those changes bring.

Love code: “I love with both passion and understanding; real love is wide awake.”

8. Growth

If growth is one of your core values, you look for opportunities to grow as a person and to help others grow, too.

You take the time to identify your values and your overall mission, so you can live in accordance with it and become more and more the person you have to be in order to fulfill your mission.

You know that growth isn’t a destination but a process, and you want to enjoy that process and help others to enjoy their own.

You might take an interest in coaching or in group growth opportunities, where members support and encourage each other. You recognize true and wholehearted collaboration as an asset and a growth facilitator, and you prioritize growth over comfort and security.

Real growth might mean shaking things up at home or at work, but the more committed you are to your growth and to that of those you care about, the less you mind rocking the boat.

Growth code: “Every day, I’m growing more into the person I want to be.”

9. Listening

If active listening is a core value for you, you value others’ input and invest time and energy in learning how to see things from their perspectives.

So, it makes sense that when someone wants to tell you something, you give them your full attention and thoughtfully consider their words.

Whereas before you felt tense with the expectation of having to defend your beliefs against an unfriendly viewpoint, you’ve learned (through practice) to listen with genuine openness rather than an ego-centric fear of being proven wrong.

You recognize that you don’t know everything, and you don’t see even familiar things from every angle, so you appreciate it when others share their perspectives. And your body language as well as your feedback shows them you’re listening and that you care about what they have to say.

Listening code: “I listen to others with my full attention, so I can learn from them and show thoughtful consideration for their ideas.”

10. Respect

If you want to be known for treating all human (or living) beings with respect, you probably base that respect on something more fundamental than someone’s rank or social status.

Otherwise, why would you consider it a priority to treat all humans with equal respect — regardless of their age, income, or background?

Or why would you put more energy into making sure the least exalted among you is treated with respect than into making sure others treat you with the same consideration.

It doesn’t mean you don’t consider yourself equally worthy of respect, but you find it easy to put yourself in other people’s shoes, so in making sure they feel respected, you feel more respected, too.

Respect code: “I treat all living beings with the same respect with which I like to be treated.”

11. Self-Giving

Another word for self-giving is sacrifice, but self-giving has a more positive connotation. Essentially, you’re giving of yourself — your time, your attention, your energy, your treasure, your abilities — to help or enrich another.

Real love doesn’t hesitate to give of itself until it hurts, knowing that the momentary pain is nothing compared to the benefit won by that self-giving.

The word “selfless” implies that someone has given so much of themselves, they’ve reserved nothing for their own use or enjoyment, but in giving yourself — if you give out of love — your joy is in what that gift brings to others.

Self-giving can be overdone but only when the motive is pride (or insecurity) rather than love.

Self-giving code: “I give of myself to others not only to connect with them but to acknowledge our connectedness. What I give to them, I also receive.”

12. Vision

You may be used to talking about vision in the context of a specific person’s “vision for the future,” but the larger sense of vision is not something that you own or that comes from you; it comes through you and inspires you and others.

Because the larger vision isn’t confined to your ego, the power of that vision is free to attract, illuminate, and flow through you.

Your vision is connected to one that is infinite and uncontainable — you do not exist to serve yourself at the expense of others; you exist to cooperate with others in the creation of a community that benefits all living creatures.

Your personal vision — what you see as your response to the larger vision — informs your personal mission and the process by which you live out that mission.

It’s not about the lifestyle you want or the things you’ll have when you’re “successful.” It has more to do with allowing yourself to be led by the greater vision through your personal links to it — your intuition and inner wisdom.

Vision code: “I live according to a vision guided by my inner wisdom and judgment.”

Now, it’s your turn.

What are your values? And what will you do today to put one (or more) of them into practice?

One small action today makes more of a difference than you probably realize.

Think of each small action as a seed you plant that, as long as you nurture it along the way, grows into a healthy tree with roots and branches, shedding seeds of its own.

Your values are the life in every seed you plant. Choose the best values, and make them part of your blueprint for personal growth.

And may your courage and passion for growth influence everything you do today.

 

~via LiveBoldandBloom.com