CAMERON DAY: “30 Minute Meditation”

 

“Ascension Help Radio with Cameron Day”

Take a journey deep within yourself to address hidden limitations holding you back so you can increase your frequency of thought. Cameron Day addresses topics such as how to put your ego mind into it’s proper place in your consciousness, how to strengthen your connection to your higher self, how to safely and effectively disconnect from harmful external energies and people, how to reclaim your energy and power from limiting beliefs, and much more. Visit AscensionHelp.com to access a free version of the Ascension Help Self-Clearing System.

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CAMERON DAY: “The Best Form of Meditation You’re (Probably) Not Doing”

You might know this about me already, but I’m a big advocate for meditation of all kinds.

There are a multitude of different types of meditation options available. With so many options, it can be pretty confusing to know what to do and what will work best for you.

I’m going to touch briefly on two popular types of meditation for this article, and then dive into a third type that is my personal favorite.

The first type of meditation is one pretty much everyone has heard of: Transcendental Meditation, or which falls into the category of “mantra meditation,” where the practitioner repeats a mantra silently in order to calm the stream of thoughts that arise from the mind.

TM has become a big business in the U.S. and is fairly expensive to get started with, but even with that facet in the mix, many people can attest that TM was the first meditation practice that they were able to continue to do long-term, which makes it a win in my book.

Meditation type number two is Guided Visualization, which I am obviously quite fond of, given my penchant for producing them. One big advantage of guided visualization is that it can allow someone who normally has trouble quieting the mind to have a meditative, healing experience.

It can also allow someone to tap into the meditative benefits of an experienced meditator by following in their footsteps, so to speak.

Our third type of meditation is what I consider the most important form of meditation in my own life, and I call it simply, “Silence Meditation” although it is also often referred to as “Mindfulness Meditation,” which I consider slightly different.

You might be surprised to hear that I don’t use guided visualizations since I produce so many of them, but that’s exactly the reason I don’t utilize them: I tend to like my own versions better.

So what is Silence Meditation? It is the simple, but not easy, act of sitting in total silence, with a focus on achieving a complete stillness in the mind. A total absence of thought, even for just a few moments.

This is simple in concept, but difficult in practice, because the mind’s nature is to produce thought and it does so consistently all day and even at night when we’re in REM sleep. Yes, our nighttime dreams are a form of thought expressing itself, and the thoughts only cease when we go down into the deepest levels of Delta sleep.

How to Silence the Mind… For a Few Moments

Upon reading the above, the mind naturally will produce a question: “How can someone use the mind to silence their mind?” There are almost as many ways of achieving this silence as there are meditators in the world, which means that there is no one right way to do it.

Since there isn’t a single “right way,” I will just tell you how I do it for myself, because my methods are somewhat unconventional. No surprise there, right?

First is the setup, or how I sit. I use a “V” shaped meditation cushion and place it in front of my couch so that I can rest my back against it. You could use a wall for this purpose, too.

This goes against the grain of meditation teachers who want people to sit fully upright with no back support. That’s great for a photo-shoot, but the reason I use something for back support is because I don’t want to be distracted by thinking about what position my body is in during meditation.

By sitting upright on my pillow while supporting my back with my couch, I eliminate one of the major distractions of sitting and meditating. For your own practice, feel free to simply sit in a chair that allows you to have upright posture. Go with whatever is the most simple and supportive for your body.

Next is blocking out the external world, which I achieve with ear plugs and a blind-fold. More specifically, I use a pair of sound-isolating “ear-buds” for playing audio. They block outside sounds better than regular ear plugs, and allow me to use one of the Genius Brain Power audio tracks to help assist my meditation if I so choose. Usually an Alpha or Theta track.

Some would consider using brainwave entrainment cheating or a crutch, but if it works for the individual, I say go for it. Now to be fair, I personally only use entrainment audio once in a while when the background noise level is too high for the ear-buds alone to block.

95% of the time I just use the ear-buds with no audio because they work better for me than standard foam ear plugs. Keep in mind that the ear plugs are optional, but if you find yourself being distracted by background noise while meditating, then I recommend trying out some ear plugs for a few sessions.

As for the blindfold, any type of blindfold will suffice, and if necessary you can improvise with whatever you have around. Even a long-sleeve shirt will do in a pinch. Enough said there.

Time Enough for Self-Love

With the setup handled, it’s time to start meditating, right? Almost. One more important thing: Use a timer! You don’t want to be distracted by thinking about how long you’ve been meditating, so a simple kitchen timer will alert you when your pre-determined time is up.

But how long should you meditate? That is entirely up to you! I personally meditate in this fashion for 22 minutes in the early morning, which is long enough to get the job done, and short enough that I won’t make up an excuse not to do it.

I arrived at 22 minutes in a somewhat arbitrary fashion. I started out at 10 minutes, and added one minute a day until I was at 20 minutes. Later I added one more minute as an easy way to accomplish 5% more meditation. Eventually I went up one more minute to 22 simply because I like repeating numbers.

So 22 is my “magic number,” but your number might be smaller, especially at first, and that’s fine! You could start with just 5 minutes if you need to, and gradually add one minute per day until you are at a number you feel is giving you the results you desire.

The most important part of choosing your meditation duration is to start small and gradually increase the time each day that you meditate IF you want. If the number feels small and easy to do, then you are far more likely to do it than if you choose a number that feels like an arduous task, or an amount of time that could make you late for work, an appointment, etc.

A shorter duration is better for those days when you’re not getting into a deep meditative state and you’re constantly silencing mind-chatter without enjoying any mental quietness. Speaking from experience, the temptation to “bail out” of the process is far smaller if I know that I won’t have to struggle with that day’s meditation for too long.

The Actual “Silence Meditation” Process

I’m seated, ears are plugged, eyes blind-folded, the timer has started and now it’s time to actually meditate. The first thing I do is start breathing slowly and deeply, putting all of my focus on my breath. After years of practice this alone produces a few moments of blissful mental silence.

But not for long! No sir! My wonderful mind has all kinds of lovely thoughts it wants me to entertain. So when the first thought comes up, I use a mental prompt to release it: Clear the Deck.

As I think those words, I also direct my mind to a brief visualization of the deck of a wooden boat, out at sea, with nothing but blue skies and blue water in every direction, and I imagine that the thoughts are being swept off the deck, down into the water.

Then I let the visualization fade away and return to focus on my breath.

Silence. Breath. Silence. “I need to mail that check to…” (or whatever thought bubbles up).

Yes, the silence doesn’t last for long, especially in the early days and weeks of meditation, and sometimes even after years of practice. But that’s okay! The mind produces thoughts. That’s one of its main jobs and it can take a lot of training to get it to go into that deep silence.

When that thought arises, and it always does, I will name the type of thought, which is a form of acceptance and acknowledgement. I don’t want to fight my mind, only to direct it, so I acknowledge the thought with one word whenever possible.

Examples: Planning, anticipating, ruminating, reminiscing, worrying, analyzing, imagining, judging, speculating.

Once I name the thought, I use my next mental prompt which is: Let it go. So it would “sound” (in my mind) like, “Planning… Let it go.” Yep, I keep things simple!

Silence. Breath. Silence. “I wonder if I’ll have time to exercise before breakfast.” “Oh… Anticipating… Let it go.”

Silence. Breath. Silence. “That guy trolling my blog really needs to get a life.” “Ahhh…judging… Let it go.”

Two More Prompts

I also use two more mental prompts to help deepen the meditative state. Over time these have become commands which my mind (usually) obeys. The first one is “Go Deep.” This pretty consistently puts me into a deeper brainwave state, which I can feel happening because I have practiced it for years, both with and without brainwave entrainment.

The other prompt is “Go Clear” which very nicely clears away any stray thoughts. I tend to use these prompts after releasing a thought with “Let it go” in order to deepen the meditative state and extend the amount of time where no thoughts are floating through my mind.

Slow It Down

I like to “speak” all of those thought-prompts very slowly in my mind. For example, if I’m thinking “Go Clear,” I will think “Gooooooooooo” on the in breath, and “Clearrrrrrrrrr” on the out breath.

Slowing down the thoughts helps lead me back to the state of non-thought more easily.

“This is Too Hard!”

When most people first try this style of meditation, they often don’t have much success at quieting the mind. That’s okay! The fact that you took some time to sit up straight, breathe deeply and even attempt to meditate is huge!

Seriously, you should congratulate yourself after every meditation session, no matter how “good” or “bad” it seemed to be.

Even if you spent the entire time “clearing the deck” and “letting it go” with no observable quieting of the mind, you should STILL give yourself a pat on the back for putting in the time and effort.

Then do it again tomorrow.

With regular practice (daily is best) you will start to have moments of pure mental silence, and over time those moments will grow longer and more frequent. There can still be bad days where you can’t put the thoughts aside, and that’s ok, too!

Remind yourself that whatever is happening in your mind is ok. Don’t fight the mind, just do your best to guide it gently into that place of silent rest.

“These Prompts Don’t Work For Me!”

This is where things get personal. Not that I will take it personally if my prompts don’t work for you, but personal in the sense that everyone will respond differently to the process of guiding their own mind into a place of silence.

The prompts that I use just might not work for you, which means that you’ll need to come up with some of your own. I think it’s fine to figure that out during the meditation session, since if the prompts you are using aren’t working, you might as well spend that time to audition some new prompts.

However, and this is a big however, I recommend that you don’t give up on the prompts until you have tried them a few times.

Why? Because using the same prompts repeatedly over time conditions the mind to respond to those prompts more effectively.

“What’s the Point?”

I know life is busy, and often the first things that we drop when we are pressed for time are self-care and self-empowering practices. However, if you can give yourself the gift of just 5-20 minutes per day of meditation practice, you will start to reap many rewards.

The state of no-thought is incredibly calming, soothing and even blissful. Five seconds of mental silence is like giving your mind a massage or warm bath. This produces mental, emotional and physical relaxation, reduces inflammation and releases beneficial hormones in the body.

With practice, this or any other type of meditation practice will help you to have “space” between stimulus (stress) and response (reaction) in your environment. Instead of cursing at the guy who cuts you off in traffic, you might find yourself taking a deep breath and saying, “Let it go” instead.

After all, that other driver can’t hear your words and your inner peace is more valuable than anger, especially when you’re driving.

Instead of snapping at your spouse/child/parent/sibling/co-worker/etc. when they push your buttons, you could find yourself taking a deep breath and calmly explaining what you truly want to communicate to them.

Those “little victories” in our day feel really good, and regular meditation can help them to happen more organically, more often.

Best Time of Day?

Opinions vary on the best time of day to meditate. For years I was more of a night-time meditator, but when I switched to meditating in the morning I found that it had profound, beneficial impacts on my state of being for the rest of the day.

Putting it simply, silence meditation in the morning makes me generally happier, less impatient and more compassionate on days that I do it compared to days where I come up with an excuse to skip it, which is very rare.

Limiting my morning meditation time to 22 minutes almost completely removes any thought of skipping it, where for mysterious psychological reasons, a 30 minute meditation is easier to skip “because I’m running late” or some other excuse.

Keeping it short and easy to achieve is the key to success in morning meditation.

Take the 5×7 Test Drive

Often one of the biggest self-imposed barriers to trying a something new is the belief that if we start doing it, we have to do that new thing forever, so we don’t even start.

So forget about forever, and instead just take a test drive of doing a silence meditation for 5 minutes per day for 7 days.

That’s it. Just 35 minutes of time over the course of a week. If you can commit to that small investment, it is possible that you will like the results so much that you decide to keep the practice, but you are not obligated by anyone, especially yourself, to do so.

Share Your Experience

Do you already meditate like this? If so, please leave a comment for how you achieve those delicious moments of mental silence. Your setup, your inner prompts, any helpful tips for others, etc.

Are you trying this for the first time, or picking it back up again? Let me know how it’s going for you.

Much Love,
Cameron Day

AscensionHelp.com
GeniusBrainPower.com

 

~via AscensionHelp.com

DR. KELLY NEFF: “8 Ways To Stop Over-Thinking And Find Peace In The Present Moment”

Overthinking (3)

We all do our best to stay positive, but occasionally we can slip into negative thinking patterns that can wreak havoc on our lives. We might worry about our past mistakes or current stresses, and how these could lead to negative outcomes in the future. We might obsess about or over-analyze regular experiences and interactions, reading into them things that aren’t actually there. We might find that as soon as one bad thing happens, we associate it with all the other bad things that have happened in our lives and begin to feel miserable. We might feel anxious in the present, having a hard time getting out of our own heads as we worry and obsess about the things that could go wrong.

If you find yourself in this place frequently, you are what psychologists call a ruminator, or, an over-thinker, and this way of thinking can be harmful to your health. Psychologists have found that over-thinking can be detrimental to human performance, and can lead to anxiety and depression, especially in women, who are much more likely than men to ruminate on stress and disappointments than men.

As a psychologist and recovering over-thinker myself, I have a lot of compassion for people who end up in these spiraling negative thought patterns. Many over-thinkers are lovely, intelligent, nurturing people who value relationships and care deeply for the people in their lives. Unfortunately, they often push away the very people that they are worrying about or seeking support and reassurance from, because they can become obsessive, anxious, depressed, negative and difficult to be around. This is not a switch in the brain that can be easily flipped off, but rather, a pattern from which it requires dedication and work to recover. Based on research in psychology and my personal experiences, here is my advice for how to stop over-thinking and find peace in the present moment:

1) Accept that You Have a Problem with Over-Thinking.

The first step to healing is acknowledging that you have a problem. If you feel like you can’t get out of your own head and over-thinking is stopping you from living a happy life, making decisions, getting things done, or forming meaningful relationships, then you have a problem. If you find yourself spiraling into negativity and depression when a bad thing happens, you have a problem. If your anxiety about the future is stopping you from enjoying the present, you have a problem. Burying your head in the sand or denying this reality will only make the situation worse. If you are not sure if you have a problem, ask your friends and loved ones to be honest with you, because they are usually the ones who will see it even if you cannot.

2) Forgive Yourself: Our Brains are Hardwired This Way

Once you can admit that you are an over-thinker, forgive yourself, because the brain is actually wired to make over-thinking a natural tendency. According to Psychologist Susan Nolen-Hoeksema, the leading expert in this field, “the organization of our brains sets us up for over-thinking” because our thoughts and memories are intrinsically woven together, not compartmentalized. So when stressors are triggered or you get into a bad mood, it can unlock a ‘cascade’ of racing negative thoughts that have nothing to do with the original trigger for the bad mood. Nolen-Hoeksema gives the example of “when poor job performance causes you to think about your aunt who died last year.”

Furthermore, when something bad happens or someone is feeling negative, they are more likely to think negative things and also see connections (that may not actually exist) between all the bad events that have happened in their lives. The more frequently this happens, the more likely the individual is to engage in this over-thinking pattern in the future.

While the brain might be wired to make these associations, once you become aware you can begin to solve the problem.

3) Breathe More

If our brains are wired in this ‘interconnected spider web’ where one bad event can trigger a tidal wave of negative thought associations, how can we break this pattern?

The first and easiest thing you can do is BREATHE. Breathing will relax you, calm you, connect you to the present moment, and ground you to Mother Earth. It sounds so simple but often when our mind starts to race to bad places, we become manic and frantic when what we need to do is relax the body and mind.

The breathing technique that works for me involves lying down and taking a two-second long deep inhalation in through the nose, followed by a four-second long exhalation out through the mouth. This breathing pattern increases the CO2 in the bloodstream, which can relax the body and calm the adrenal system’s response to the obsessive thoughts. Do this for 10 minutes or until the excessive thinking slows down.

4) Talk Less

So many over-thinkers, especially those of us of the female persuasion, can’t help but want to ‘talk it out’ when we are feeling stressed and worried. While talking about the worries can sometimes help, it usually will make things worse, especially if the person you are talking to is also an over-thinker, and you spend the entire time over-analyzing and dissecting every detail of every negative problem in your lives. You might end up working yourself up into a frenzy of negativity and feeling even more upset after the conversation.

This type of co-rumination, where two ruminators get together to over-think about their lives together, can lead both people deeper into negativity and stress. For example, research has uncovered an association between co-rumination amongst female friends and increases in the stress hormone cortisol.

If you really feel the need to express your issues, you can always write them down, to clear them out of your mind and realize that your concerns might sound silly when you read them back to yourself. This type of free-association journaling has been incredibly beneficial for me.

5) Get Physical and Get Busy

What should you do instead of talking? Well, you already know to breathe to calm the body and mind, but sometimes you just want to let the energy out! In this case it can be incredibly beneficial to do something physical, whether it is going for a brisk walk, playing with a pet or children, doing yoga, playing sports, swimming, or running. Activities that are both mentally and physically engrossing are the best, because they require enough absorption to pull you out of obsessive thinking patterns and into a state of flow.

In addition to physical exercises, engrossing activities that stimulate the brain can also be effective for redirecting obsessive thought patterns. Playing cards, learning a language, or playing all different types of games can be great diversions or interrupters of these thoughts. Or you could always learn a new hobby, make art, draw, paint or take up crafting, such as making jewelry, clothes, dream catchers, hair extensions, really anything, You might actually discover a hidden talent you never knew you had, or be able to start a new career or meet new people as a result.

6) Practice Mindfulness

One of the big things that over-thinkers struggle with is the ability to live in the present moment. So consumed by the failures of the past and the worries over the future, the present moment does not get the attention and love it deserves. Lao Tzu said that “if you are depressed you are living in the past, if you are anxious you are living in the future, and if you are at peace you are living in the present.” So how can we live in peace in the present moment?

Well, we have already discussed some of the strategies that can help you quiet the mind and ground yourself to present moment, including breathing, talking less, getting physical and doing other activities that help redirect attention and bring the mind into flow. But one of the best things you can possibly do is practice mindfulness, a form of meditation where you focus on the present moment without judgment. As the obsessive, worrying thoughts come in, you acknowledge them, and then let them go, energetically releasing them and clearing your space. I strongly recommend learning mindful meditation techniques such as Transcendental Meditation, or if you are having trouble doing it yourself, seeking counseling from someone who practices Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy.

7)   Surrender to the Universe

When we worry, we are essentially hoping to control the flow of life because we are attached to the outcome of a situation. We want things to happen a certain way, and we are terrified that things could go wrong or that bad things could happen. In reality, we have little to no control over the unfolding of events in life, at least not from the conscious standpoint that our worrying will directly impact the outcome in the way we want. So, we can worry and obsess, or we can accept all that IS and let go of our attachment to the outcomes. The universe is way older and wiser than us, and instead of obsessively worrying, we can let go of control and with love and trust, surrender to the universe.

Surrender does not mean giving up; It just means you are willing to go with the flow of the current, instead of trying to swim against it and getting repeatedly bashed into the rocks. Surrender is a form of release and a form of peace, because it means you are willing to trust that everything will work out as it is supposed to: Trust that everything happens in its proper time and place and you are exactly where you are supposed to be. Even the concept of worrying about ‘good’ or ‘bad’ outcomes is flawed from this perspective and nothing more than a symptom of duality, which is only an illusion. As you zoom out to the grand scheme of the universe, there is no such thing as ‘good’ or ‘bad’ – it is all ONE, two sides of the same coin.

8)   Remember, Your Thoughts Create Your Reality

Even though I just said that ‘we have no control over the unfolding of events in life,’ and this is true at least from the part of the conscious mind and its ability to dictate events, our thoughts do energetically shape and create our reality over time. Like attracts like, and so the more you worry about something, the more you will begin to attract exactly the energy you are worried about! If you still haven’t seen the wonderful online series Spirit Science, I strongly recommend you view Episode 1, which does an excellent job explaining how our thoughts create our reality.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmN2RL4VJsE

 

We must be mindful of our thoughts because our thoughts have power, more than we realize. If you obsessively fear losing your job, you are actually INCREASING the likelihood of getting fired, not decreasing it. Same if you are worrying about contracting a life-threatening disease or medical condition: The more energy you send in that direction, the more likely you are to unknowingly give permission to your body to manifest this condition.

Your thoughts and feelings will energetically create your life, which is why my life partner, sound healer Jimmy Ohm always says, “Worrying is a misuse of creative energy.” Do you want to create a happy life, living at peace in the moment? If so, you have all of the tools to make this a reality by being mindful and present in your thoughts. You also have all of the tools to create a life of worry and negativity, if you continue to over-think and obsess about negative events. The choice is yours and I lovingly hope that you choose wisely. Blessings and Love!

Authors Note: Do you agree? Are you an over-thinker or recovering over-thinker? Have these tips worked for you? What other suggestions can you make to break this cycle? I would love to hear from you on Facebook!

About the author:
Dr. Kelly Neff is a renowned psychologist, author, founder of The Lucid Planet and the host of the hit new show, Lucid Planet Radio. She has reached millions of people with her articles on psychology, transformation, and wellness, which have been featured on websites like The Mind Unleashed, Mind Body Green, My Tiny Secrets, and now, The Lucid Planet. Before she became a full-time author, Dr. Neff spent seven years as a psychology professor where she helped thousands of students learn about health, relationships, love and sexuality, and co-authored the groundbreaking manual in her field, Teaching Psychology Online. She has a B.A. in Psychology from Georgetown University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Claremont Graduate University. Dr. Neff is an avid participant in the visionary art, music and culture scene in her home state of Colorado and beyond. You might find her traveling the globe to give workshops, speeches and do research at transformational festivals. You can find her on Facebook and Twitter. Light and Love!

~viaBodyMindSoulSpirit.com