NEZEL PADAYHAG: “6 Ways To Tap Into Your Heart’s Intelligence And Wisdom”

In life, you may have certainly been in a situation where you need to decide between the contradictory opinions of your heart and your mind.

Things become more difficult when people remind you that your head is where your brain is because it’s higher. Though your heart is protesting, you follow what looks logical and correct.

For decisions involving the most correct choice, like whether or not you should dump a narcissist partner, it’s only wiser to decide with the mind.

However, the function of your heart goes far beyond supporting life.

The heart is also an intelligent organ that interferes with your decision making process, the reason why it wants to be given due consideration at times.

How To Tap Into Your Heart’s Intelligence And Wisdom:

The heart as Hridaya

Researcher Gregg Braden has dug into the ancient technique of using the heart as an intelligent organ.

The functions of the heart go far beyond supporting life and sending blood all throughout the body. It has a wisdom that’s not influenced by the ego.

As such, it gives you information from a neutral place. Your heart knows your past, present, and future. Since it does not have any egoic tendencies, it always has your best interest at heart.

The Sanskrit word Hridaya, which comes from ‘Hrid’ meaning ‘center’, and ‘Ayam’ meaning ‘this’, describes the heart’s intellect as the energy that is contained within the heart chakra.

More than a physical heart, it also is a spiritual heart that contains the intelligence of God or the transcendental mind.

This spiritual heart sees to it that you perceive things from your center and not stray away from your Highest Self.

The yogi Bhagavan describes the heart center as a seat of Pure Consciousness, realized Existence, Knowledge, and Bliss.

The mind of your brain operates from your past experiences and past erroneous beliefs assigned to those experiences. In short, it creates false perceptions just to arrive what for you is the ‘right’ answer, even topping those false concepts with emotional investment.

The Heart’s Neurobiology

The neurobiology of the heart has these significant points:

– The heart has more fibers leading to the brain than from the brain to the heart, making more communication to take place in the heart.

– The heart of an unborn fetus beats before the brain has been formed. And humans form an emotional brain before a rational one.

– The heart has an independent complex nervous system known as the ‘brain of the heart.’

– The heart can create coherence in the body through its rhythm.

– The heart’s electromagnetic field is greater than that of the brain, which can be detected several feet away.

– The heart has wisdom.

The wisdom of the heart is what provides us with clear decisions that are being governed by our highest self. Gregg Braden suggests the following tips to tap into the heart’s intelligence.

6 Tips On Tapping Into The Heart’s Intelligence

1. Focus on your heart with the intention of seeking its intelligence.

2. Breathe slowly to calm your nerves and silence your brain.

3. Have a deep sense of gratitude, compassion, and love to activate the heart’s energy.

4. Ask a brief and accurate question to your heart.

5. Notice the different feelings or bodily sensations.

6. Keep this practice regularly.

The heart’s intelligence is subjective and wouldn’t be the same for everyone. You may feel butterflies in the gut, a warm sensation throughout your body, or tingling in the fingertips. Or, you might even receive a clear, short and kind answer in your mind.

Establishing this deeper connection with your heart takes time. Persist with the practice and listen to your heart more.

There’s no reward as great as listening to your heart that’s leading you to your purpose.

 

~via LifeCoachCode.com

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CHRYSILLA LEWIES: “Forgetful Lately? Here’s The Surprising Reason Why!”

Do you feel like you are losing your mind, forgetting simple details? Rest assured you’re not, it’s actually one of the ascension symptoms we are all currently experiencing.

You can’t seem to remember what someone told you yesterday or maybe it just feels like your mind is becoming a sieve. You start thinking that you might need Memory supplements, your friends suggest reading more to challenge your mind to keep it active; and It’s true, we all need to use our muscles to keep them healthy. The brain is a muscle, but we don’t seem to use it as much as we use to. Let’s face it, technology has taken over a lot of problem solving tasks, but this is not the reason we are losing our memory, it is actually the complete opposite.

Our consciousness is gradually splitting away from the physical world and we no longer need to rely on our physical mind as much as we have done in the past. We are moving into higher states of consciousness and moving into the era of knowingness.

Forgetful Lately? Here’s The Surprising Reason WHY!

There is no better time than the present to practice to trust your internal guidance and to follow your intuition. By sitting in quiet meditation and getting to know how the real YOU feel — your essence as a pure energy being. You will find the balance between the heart and mind as you become more aware of the changes happening within you. You will start to notice how your feelings are pulling you into the direction you are meant to be going. These thoughts might be as subtle as:

  • “I knew I should have taken that exit on the motorway!”
  • “I got a feeling that I should have taken different route home, but didn’t”, or
  • “I don’t think I should go to this event, something doesn’t feel right.”

When living in your thinking mind and you are analyzing every decision you make or would like to make — will lead you to miss crucial opportunities. If you do, it might lead you to look at something and instinctively where you will know that something might happen before it actually does. You may get a feeling of knowingness and you get the opportunity to follow and trust your intuition. But do you?

When you are consciously thinking, you can feel the mind as it is working, analyzing and compartmentalizing. Sometimes you get home after a long day at work and you are tired, but not because of the physical work but the mental thinking you have been doing. Moving into the era of knowingness, your mind will no longer have to work as hard. Your mind feels empty and it feels like you’re not retaining as much information as you used to. Think of it as you storing the information in ‘The Cloud’.

The knowingness will come to you in a manner where you will be able to automatically read a person by just being in their auric field or connecting to them through thought. You may experience having a knowingness of what they are feeling without being in their presence. You may be so connected to someone that you will immediately know when something is wrong, and you will be guided to pick up the phone and call them.

The key is to Trust.

Enhance your natural abilities through practicing psychometry, meditation and or any other techniques that will allow you to use your senses more, instead of your mind.

Intuition Group Exercise

One person should draw shapes of all kinds on different pieces of paper.

Shuffle them and then give one to each member in you group.

No one will know what was drawn but you.

Take turns, and tune into one drawing.

Guess by describing what you see.

A minimum of two can participate and an ideal group size of 6.

 

Have Fun!

 

 

~via In5D.com

JOE BATTAGLIA: “If You Want To Accelerate Brain Development In Children — Teach Them Music”

violin (2)

Alternative and complementary treatments such as creative art, meditation, and yoga have been proposed to bridge many gaps that conventional medicine cannot. But music, because of its ubiquity in our society as well as its ease of transmission, has perhaps the greatest potential among alternative therapies to reach people in deep and profound ways. Music matters and it heals.

Music instruction appears to accelerate brain development in young children, particularly in the areas of the brain responsible for processing sound, language development, speech perception and reading skills, according to initial results of a five-year study by USC neuroscientists.

We now know through controlled treatment outcome studies that listening to and playing music is a potent treatment for mental health issues. 400 published scientific papers have proven the old adage that “music is medicine.”

Research demonstrates that adding music therapy to treatment improves symptoms and social functioning among schizophrenics. Further, music therapy has demonstrated efficacy as an independent treatment for reducing depression, anxiety and chronic pain.

The Brain and Creativity Institute (BCI) at USC began the five-year study in 2012 in partnership with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Association and the Heart of Los Angeles (HOLA) to examine the impact of music instruction on children’s social, emotional and cognitive development.

These initial study results, published recently in the journal Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, provide evidence of the benefits of music education at a time when many schools around the nation have either eliminated or reduced music and arts programs. The study shows music instruction speeds up the maturation of the auditory pathway in the brain and increases its efficiency.

“We are broadly interested in the impact of music training on cognitive, socio-emotional and brain development of children,” said Assal Habibi, the study’s lead author and a senior research associate at the BCI in the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. “These results reflect that children with music training, compared with the two other comparison groups, were more accurate in processing sound.”

For this longitudinal study, the neuroscientists are monitoring brain development and behavior in a group of 37 children from underprivileged neighborhoods of Los Angeles.

Thirteen of the children, at 6 or 7 years old, began to receive music instruction through the Youth Orchestra Los Angeles program at HOLA. The community music training program was inspired by the El Sistema method, one that LA Philharmonic conductor Gustavo Dudamel had been in when he was growing up in Venezuela.


Learning the Violin

The children earn to play instruments, such as the violin, in ensembles and groups, and they practice up to seven hours a week.

The scientists are comparing the budding musicians with peers in two other groups: 11 children in a community soccer program, and 13 children who are not involved in any specific after-school programs.

The neuroscientists are using several tools to monitor changes in them as they grow: MRI to monitor changes through brain scans, EEG to track electrical activity in the brains, behavioral testing and other such techniques.

Within two years of the study, the neuroscientists found the auditory systems of children in the music program were maturing faster in them than in the other children. The fine-tuning of their auditory pathway could accelerate their development of language and reading, as well as other abilities – a potential effect which the scientists are continuing to study.

The enhanced maturity reflects an increase in neuroplasticity – a physiological change in the brain in response to its environment – in this case, exposure to music and music instruction.

“The auditory system is stimulated by music,” Habibi said. “This system is also engaged in general sound processing that is fundamental to language development, reading skills and successful communication.”


Ear to Brain

The auditory system connects our ear to our brain to process sound. When we hear something, our ears receive it in the form of vibrations that it converts into a neural signal. That signal is then sent to the brainstem, up to the thalamus at the center of the brain, and outward to its final destination, the primary auditory cortex, located near the sides of the brain.

The progress of a child’s developing auditory pathway can be measured by EEG, which tracks electrical signals, specifically those referred to as “auditory evoked potentials.”

In this study, the scientists focused on an evoked potential called P1. They tracked amplitude – the number of neurons firing – as well as latency – the speed that the signal is transmitted. Both measures infer the maturity of the brain’s auditory pathways.

As children develop, both amplitude and the latency of P1 tend to decrease. This means that that they are becoming more efficient at processing sound.

At the beginning of the study and again two years later, the children completed a task measuring their abilities to distinguish tone. As the EEG was recording their electrical signals, they listened to violin tones, piano tones and single-frequency (pure) tones played.

The children also competed a tonal and rhythm discrimination task in which they were asked to identify similar and different melodies. Twice, they heard 24 melodies in randomized order and were asked to identify which ones differed in tone and rhythm, and which were the same in tone and rhythm.

Children who were in the youth orchestra program were more accurate at detecting pitch changes in the melodies than the other two groups. All three groups were able to identify easily when the melodies were the same. However, children with music training had smaller P1 potential amplitude compared to the other children, indicating a faster rate of maturation.

“We observed a decrease in P1 amplitude and latency that was the largest in the music group compared to age-matched control groups after two years of training,” the scientists wrote. “In addition, focusing just on the (second) year data, the music group showed the smallest amplitude of P1 compared to both the control and sports group, in combination with the accelerated development of the N1 component.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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