NEZEL PADAYHAG: “How Each Of The 5 Basic Brainwave States Shapes Your Reality”

Most of us grew into believing that our reality shapes us. But as science advances, we come to the understanding that, in the most part, we have the power to shape our reality.

Now you must know the difference between reality and the actual world. A reality is the personal world you shape and perceive from the actual world around you.

If you change your reality you actually change your own personal world. Knowing how our brain’s activity influences our perception of the world is the first step in this pursuit.

Your neural connections and brain chemicals might be responsible for your emotions and your perception of the world.

However, more studies point to the importance your brainwave frequency plays in your body’s biologic functions and the shape of your reality.

Even your ability to focus is controlled by your brainwave state. Your unique brainwave activity, with its rhythm and pattern, matches each of your activities.

The brain’s millions of neurological synapses operate on electrical impulses resulting in an overall frequency. This frequency or wavelength directly affects your consciousness.

If you have the ability to measure these waves, you can have the ability to control your own biology.

The basic brainwave states are associated with different mental states and each of these states impacts the shape of your reality in a different way.

The 5 Basic Brainwave States And Their Effect On Reality:

1. Alpha

Alpha waves slow the cycle of your brainwave at 7 to 12 Hertz and help you relax. This state is often associated with imagination, visualization, peace, safety, and relieving stress.

When watching movies or television, this is your brain state. You can also access the deeper realm of consciousness with this state.

2. Beta

Beta waves enhance concentration, cognition, alertness, and focus.

Having a frequency of 13 to 40 Hertz, beta waves help you make quick connections, find ideas for your creative projects, and have the best state of mind when engaging in sports and other physical activities.

3. Theta

Theta is the best state to be when you want to meditate, increase your creativity, memory, intuition, and other extrasensory perception skills. This “shamanic” state of consciousness has a frequency of 4 to 7 Hertz.

Theta waves also increase your chances of becoming more receptive, having visions and flashes that are almost dreamlike, becoming inspired, and digging into your buried memories. This realm is considered elusive and mysterious because brain activity slows down to a point that almost induce you to sleep.

4. Delta

Being the slowest brain wave at 0 to 4 Hertz, Delta is the state of your mind when you’re in deep sleep.

Delta waves are crucial for your body’s restoration and healing. Delta is also the state where your unconscious mind operates.

5. Gamma

Gamma is the newly discovered frequency and has a hyperspeed frequency that is above 40 Hertz. Because of this, not many discoveries have been associated with it.

So far, the Gamma waves are understood to be associated with high level information processing and bursts of higher order thinking and insight.

Conclusion:

On a regular day, different parts of your brain are oscillating on different frequencies even if, at some point, most parts of the brain operate on one dominant frequency within.

To be operating on the same frequency, wherein the brain could work as one, is the ideal state to be because it can make you feel the most powerful.

Some people have been using methods for brain entrainment, like binaural beats to control and make the most of their brainwave frequencies.

Clearly, if you want to change your reality, you can do something about it by using these states in your favor.

Let’s say you want to shift from a stressful mental state to a relaxed one, you can try listening to the kind of frequency that supports the mental state you want to be in.

It’s simple and cheap because you can do it right from the comforts of your own home and all you need is knowing yourself.

 

~via LifeCoachCode.com

JENN GRANNEMAN: “Here’s the Scientific Explanation for Why Introverts Like Being Alone”

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I’m an introvert, so I need plenty of “alone” time. If I don’t get enough, I’m not myself. I feel worn out and cranky. I get short with people, because every little annoyance seems magnified. I want to sneak away and hide for a while.

Spending time alone—reading, writing, or just hanging around my apartment doing nothing—recharges me. It’s like what author Jonathan Rauch writes:

“For introverts, to be alone with our thoughts is as restorative as sleeping, as nourishing as eating.”

Rauch’s own formula is to spend two hours alone recharging for every hour he spends socializing.

Extroverts, on the other hand, actually feel energized when they’re on-the-go or hanging out with others. Many extroverts get restless and bored when they have to be alone for too long. But me? I could spend hours (or days) alone and feel great.

So why do introverts need more alone time than extroverts? The answer is found in the wiring of our brains.

It’s All in Your Head

Our need for alone time has to do with a chemical called dopamine. Both introverts and extroverts have dopamine in their brains, but they respond to it differently.

What is dopamine? It’s a neurotransmitter that helps control your brain’s pleasure and reward centers. It makes us notice opportunities to get external rewards (like money, social status, and sex) and take action to get them.

Imagine you and your extroverted friend are at a bar. You both see an attractive person across the room. Dopamine floods both of your brains as you think about flirting with this person. Your extroverted friend feels a thrilling rush of “happiness hits” from dopamine. But you feel nervous and somewhat overwhelmed. Sound familiar?

This is because extroverts have a more active dopamine reward network than introverts. Basically, they need more dopamine to feel its pleasant effects, explains Dr. Marti Olsen Laney in her book The Introvert Advantage: How Quiet People Can Thrive in an Extrovert World.

For introverts, too much of a good thing really is too much. We feel overstimulated when dopamine floods our brains.

When we spend time alone, we’re not faced with situations like talking to an attractive stranger. Essentially we’re lowering our level of external stimulation. Being alone feels just right for our dopamine-sensitive system.

Acetylcholine Is Where It’s At

Forget dopamine. Introverts would rather bask in another neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, explains Christine Fonseca in her book Quiet Kids: Help Your Introverted Child Succeed in an Extroverted World. Like dopamine, acetylcholine is also linked to pleasure. The difference is, acetylcholine makes us feel good when we turn inward. It powers our abilities to think deeply, reflect, and focus intensely on just one thing for a long period of time.

This helps further explain why introverts like being alone: it’s easier to turn inward when we’re not paying attention to other people.

Let Us Rest and Digest

According to Laney, everyone’s nervous system has two modes: parasympathetic and sympathetic. When we use the parasympathetic side (nicknamed the “rest and digest” side), we feel calm and are focused inwardly. Our body conserves energy and withdraws from the environment; muscles relax, energy is stored, food is metabolized, pupils constrict to reduce light, and our heart rate and blood pressure slow. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine increases blood flow and alertness in the front of the brain.

The sympathetic side is known as the “full-throttle” or “fight, fright, or flight” system. This side mobilizes us toward discovering new things and makes us active, daring, or inquisitive. The brain becomes alert and hyper-focused on its surroundings. Blood sugar and free fatty acids are elevated to give us more energy, and digestion is slowed. Thinking is reduced, and we become prepared to make snap decisions.

Of course, introverts and extroverts use both sides of their nervous system at different times. But just like introverts and extroverts respond differently to dopamine, we prefer different sides of the nervous system. You can probably guess which side introverts prefer: the parasympathetic side.

Are You Getting Enough Alone Time?

It can be hard to get enough alone time. We may feel guilty when we turn down social plans or tell our significant other we want a night to ourselves. However, not getting enough alone time can affect us physically and emotionally. According to Laney, you may not be getting enough alone time if you regularly experience some of these symptoms:

  • Trouble sleeping or eating
  • Frequent colds, headaches, back pains, or allergies
  • Feeling anxious, agitated, irritable, and “snappish”
  • Unable to think, concentrate, or make decisions
  • Confused and discombobulated, as if you are dashing from thing to thing in a blur
  • Trapped and wondering what is the meaning of life
  • Drained, tired, and put-upon
  • Disconnected from yourself

What should you do? Make it a priority to include alone time in your day, even if it’s only a few minutes of catching your breath alone in your car or bedroom. Laney writes, “Many introverts have felt so stigmatized about the private, reserved aspect of their nature that they have not allowed themselves the time to develop effective restorative practices. It’s time to change that!”  retina_favicon1


PH circle 2What’s your personality type? Knowing your personality can help you leverage your natural strengths. Take the free personality test from our partner Personality Hacker.

 

 

http://introvertdear.com